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History's built in at Farley Vale
Historic King George farm is site of log cabin's construction

 The Eastern white pine logs will provide the log cabin's interior with a rustic atmosphere.
RICHARD AMRHINE/THE FREE LANCE-STAR
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Date published: 3/2/2012

BY RICHARD AMRHINE

Get ready for plenty of "re" words in this story-- like recycling, reusing and reclaiming--because all of those activities play a key role in the construction of a log cabin at Farley Vale Farm in King George County.

According to Edward and Weber Taylor, who have owned the 932-acre property since 1957, many of the materials being used were already there, from excavated rocks that have lodged there since the beginning of time, to the railroad ties from a track that has come and gone more recently.

"We wanted to reuse as much as we could of what was already here," said Weber Taylor about the project, whether it occurred naturally or was otherwise a part of the property's history.

The plan was to provide son Letcher with a place of his own to live on the family farm, which borders the Rappahannock River. The family settled on building a log cabin, because they like the rustic nature of a cabin and felt it would fit nicely on the historic property. Weber Taylor loves the the beauty of the wood.

Letcher Taylor explained that his mobility has been limited by an issue with hip-replacement surgery. But what he loves to do, and by all accounts does very well, is cook. To let him pursue that talent, most of the cabin's main level will be a kitchen. Among other things, the kitchen will include a 60-inch professional stainless-steel range. There are also large windows that will provide ample views of the "vale" and the Rappahannock.

But that sort of information is for the next story, when the cabin is completed.

HIRING BARNES CUSTOM

Perhaps because they live on a farm that was settled in 1794, the Taylors appreciate something that has lasting quality. So they called on John William Barnes III, who owns Barnes Custom Inc. of Montross, which, as his business card indicates, "specializes in custom and log homes." This project is both.

"We have always appreciated the old way of doing things," said Barnes. "Some companies will give you a kit and say 'Here you go,' and you're not going to be happy with what you end up with."


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