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Charged 15 times for one plane ticket


Date published: 10/14/2012

IT WAS A WEEKEND Maryrose Solis would rather forget.

On Friday, Aug. 3, she took advantage of a Southwest Airlines sale to book a round-trip from Atlanta to San Diego for $196, about half the regular fare. The airline was running a one-day sale to celebrate its 3 millionth Facebook fan.

Solis, who lives in Smyrna, Ga., wanted to visit her sister, who's expecting a baby, and since she's between jobs, money is a little tight. The Southwest ticket price met her budget.

But when she checked her credit card account a few hours later, she found more than $5,000 in charges from Southwest. A software hiccup had generated multiple bookings for her, maxing her credit card. "It was a fiasco," she says.

Turns out, she wasn't alone. Thousands of other Southwest customers experienced the same billing glitch, with bargain-hunters being overbilled--in some instances dramatically so-- for what they thought would be a fare deal.

In a statement on its site, Southwest admitted "website performance issues" that triggered multiple unwanted reservations. "We realize that some customers were charged more than once for the same reservation and we want to ensure you that we have all hands on deck, actively working to process refunds for any duplicate charges incurred."

Teresa Laraba, Southwest's senior vice president for customer services, declined to say what exactly went wrong, describing it only as a "technological issue and challenge."

"I'm glad to say, our teams worked hard to find and fix it within hours of this problem surfacing," she told me.

This fare-sale foul-up and its eventual resolution raise important questions for travelers who book airline tickets online, particularly during times of peak demand. Chief among them: Is there a way to prevent an airline, or any business, from inadvertently billing your card until you've reached your credit limit? The short answer: No.

Under the Fair Credit Billing Act, consumers like Solis are afforded some protection, but it's an imperfect remedy. Solis has 60 days to report the incorrect billing, and her financial institution is required by law to acknowledge her dispute within 30 days and take action within three months. By then, the overcharge would have wreaked havoc on her finances.


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