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Coal supporters unite in rally


 Thomas Peak (center) and Allen Stapleton (right) came from their mine jobs to join others at the United for Coal demonstration in Wise County in Southwest Virginia on Saturday.
Debra McCown/ASSOCIATED PRESS
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Date published: 10/14/2012

BY DEBRA McCOWN

Associated Press

BIG STONE GAP, Va.

--The honking of horns was deafening along U.S. Highway 23 in Southwest Virginia on Saturday, where hundreds of people stretched out along the four-lane road to show their support for coal.

"If coal gets shut down, everything's going to get shut down," said Thomas Peak of Big Stone Gap, who came straight from work at a local mine for the demonstration, his face still covered in coal dust.

"I'd lose my house, I'd lose my vehicles, I've got three kids," he said. "Everybody around here would lose everything they had."

Groups of coal supporters that lined up sporadically along this Virginia highway were among thousands of people who turned out in at least three states to put a human face on an embattled industry. Its plight has become an issue in the presidential as well as in local and statewide races, with Republicans asserting that Democratic environmental policies are hurting the industry, a charge denied by the Obama administration.

Many of those gathered voiced similar feelings: They believe politicians and environmentalists are to blame for thousands of recent coal-industry layoffs, which have left some families struggling to pay their bills and local governments hard-pressed to balance their budgets as severance tax revenue drops.

"The average coal mining job is a $70,000 job, and that's a low figure. Multiply that by 10,000 people (who have lost coal jobs around the country). You can't replace $700 million in the economy," said Chris Meade, general manager for a mining supply company in Big Stone Gap. "For every coal job they take, if they want to bring in a green energy job, we'll build solar panels. We'll build windmills. But we've got coal" already.

Between January and June, West Virginia, Kentucky and Virginia lost a combined 3,000 coal jobs, not including contractors. According to Mine Safety and Health Administration employment figures, Kentucky lost 1,672, West Virginia lost 1,167 and Virginia lost 145 in the first six months of the year.

The event was largest around Pikeville, Ky., said Kendall Wright, who flew his helicopter over the event Saturday to help photographers and videographers get a look at the crowds. He estimated that about 5,000 people turned out in the area around Pikeville and toward the West Virginia line.


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