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Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, Jan. 8, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. Invisible. Danielle Steel. Delacorte 2. The Judge’s List. John Grisham. ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, Jan. 8, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. "Invisible: A Novel" by Danielle Steel (Delacorte) Last week: — 2. "The ...

"Seasonal Work: Stories" by Laura Lippman; William Morrow (336 pages, $26.99) ——— Laura Lippman has been mixing it up lately. Long known as a top-notch crime fiction writer, two years ago she delivered a terrific essay collection, "My Life as a Villainess." Last year she turned to psychological horror with the deliciously twisty "Dream Girl." Her new book, "Seasonal Work," is a short story ...

James Rollins' new fantasy novel, "The Starless Crown," is set in a mythical world menaced by marauding beasts and threatened by an impending collision with the moon. It is the first installment of a series that was more than eight years in the making, but its roots stretch all the way back to Rollins' childhood as James Czajkowski, the older brother from hell. "I had a lot of younger siblings ...

A deeply moving cri de coeur about the power of love to fight despair. "To Paradise" by Hanya Yanagihara; Doubleday (720 pages, $32.50) ——— "To Paradise," Hanya Yanagihara's ambitious follow-up to "A Little Life," a National Book Award finalist, is an epic in size and scope. The novel is divided into three books, each featuring characters with the same names living in the same house in New ...

NONFICTION: A legendary newspaper journalist looks back at the formative years of his career. "Chasing History: A Kid in the Newsroom" by Carl Bernstein; Henry Holt (384 pages, $29.99) ——— Fear not, aspiring journalists with lousy academic records. You, too, could be in danger of not graduating from high school yet still go on to help bring down a president and become one of the best-known ...

A new year, a new stack of paperbacks (ideally). Here are six fresh picks; mostly fiction, all promising. "A Lie Someone Told You About Yourself" by Peter Ho Davies (HarperCollins, $15.99). Davies, author of "The Fortunes" and "The Welsh Girl," here spins a semiautobiographical novel about a writer becoming a father. "This is a complicated story, told with fearless honesty," wrote a reviewer ...

I’ve been reading about transformation. Which is what you’re supposed to be thinking about at the onset of a new year — a new you, refreshed and eager, free from the excess and confusion that accumulated over the past 12 months and culminated with six weeks of anxiety and joy and gratitude and melancholy. That’s all behind you now. Begin again! Hit factory reset! At least that’s the elevator ...

Why, I ask myself, do I have such an absurd number of books? We had a friend over for dinner the other night. Even though we are all fully vaccinated, it felt a little risky, but this was a rare balmy winter evening so we sat on the drafty three-season porch for a while and then moved in by the fire, with a window cracked. My husband and I had done the requisite tidying up — dusting, ...

A sublime, erudite memoir explores the connection between grief and love. "Lost & Found" by Kathryn Schulz; Random House (236 pages, $27) ——— Near the end of "Lost & Found," her sublime, compassionate new memoir, Kathryn Schulz revisits the myth of Eros, the sickly, lonely son of Aphrodite, and his younger brother, Anteros, conceived as a kind of caretaker. These gods embodied the push-pull of ...

AUSTIN, Texas — We first ask Noah Hawley: “How are you feeling?” “It’s a hard question to answer,” says Hawley, the Austin author, filmmaker and TV showrunner whose expansive new novel, “Anthem,” came out Jan. 4. He muses. He asks if we can skip ahead to the next question. We say sure, but mention that the book lends itself to inward exploration. He muses some more. “The book is how I’m ...

"The Unfamiliar Garden," the second novel in Benjamin Percy's speculative fiction series "Comet Cycle," begins with the mysterious disappearance of a child, Mia, in a forest outside Seattle. Right about that time, a comet shoots past Earth, emitting a strange fungus that begins to absorb plants, animals and humans. (And Mia? Maybe. But maybe not.) Percy's novel defies categorization — part ...

Jean Chen Ho's virtuosic debut collection of short stories follows relationships over three decades. "Fiona and Jane" by Jean Chen Ho; Viking (288 pages, $26) ——— Fiona and Jane, the dual protagonists of Jean Chen Ho's virtuosic debut collection of short stories, have been best friends since second grade. In alternating perspectives, the book follows the arc of their relationship over three ...

A heartfelt tale about a mother and daughter separated in parallel universes brought about by the power of language. "Present Tense Machine" by Gunnhild Øyehaug, translated from the Norwegian by Kari Dickson; Farrar, Straus & Giroux (176 pages, $25) ——— On May 30, 2020, German pianist Igor Levit sat down in an empty studio to play Erik Satie's "Vexations," a marathon work comprising 840 ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, Jan. 1, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. The Judge’s List. John Grisham. Doubleday 2. The Stranger in the ...

Here are the bestsellers for the week that ended Saturday, Jan. 1, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by NPD BookScan © 2022 NPD Group. (Reprinted from Publishers Weekly, published by PWxyz LLC. © 2022, PWxyz LLC.) HARDCOVER FICTION 1. "The Judge’s List: A Novel" by John Grisham (Doubleday) Last week: 1 2. ...

Deceptively simple stories by a master of the form perfectly capture moments of reckoning and reflection, in life and in art. "Blank Pages and Other Stories" by Bernard MacLaverty; W.W. Norton (272 pages, $26.95) ——— "In dreams begin responsibilities." The line, an epigraph from W.B. Yeats' 1914 book "Responsibilities," came to mind as I read the stories in "Blank Pages." Bernard MacLaverty, ...

Set in England and China, a smart, expansive novel considers the toll of extremist beliefs. "The Sisters Mao" by Gavin McCrea; Scribe (560 pages, $28) ——— "The Sisters Mao," Gavin McCrea's second novel, is a stirring, perceptive exploration of radical politics. Two of the Irish writer's protagonists, sisters Iris and Eva Thurlow, are among a small number of disaffected Londoners who live ...

CHICAGO — Years ago I had a dream that I worked for Annie Leibovitz and she hated me, so she made me work on Thanksgiving and then she fired me because the alligator that I personally wrangled for Nicole Kidman to ride in a photograph for the next issue of Vanity Fair, the poor creature looked tired. I’m not joking about that dream. I think I had just read a biography of Rolling Stone founder ...

Here's hoping that 2022 brings us ... oh, at this point, I'll settle for anything halfway decent. But here are 15 much-anticipated books that might make the new year bright, arranged in order of planned publication. "To Paradise" by Hanya Yanagihara (Penguin Random House, Jan. 11) It's been seven years since the publication of Yanagihara's acclaimed previous novel "A Little Life"; now she ...

And now we get to play soothsayer and peek into the future. Here are some of the titles publishing in the first quarter of the new year that we are most looking forward to reading: 'To Paradise,' by Hanya Yanagihara. (Doubleday, Jan. 11.) Her 2015 novel, "A Little Life," won the Kirkus Prize for Fiction and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize, the National Book Award and International ...

A reporter returns to India to write about a grisly crime. "Honor" by Thrity Umrigar; Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill (326 pages, $26.95, in stores Jan. 11) ——— Thrity Umrigar's latest novel, "Honor," begins with a vacation cut short when Smita Agarwal, a foreign correspondent from Brooklyn, is forced to abandon the sunny beaches of the Maldives for an unexpected detour to bustling Mumbai. She ...

Part memoir, part history by a lawyer who fought foreclosures on family farms in the 1980s. "The Farmer's Lawyer: The North Dakota Nine and the Fight to Save the Family Farm" by Sarah Vogel; Bloomsbury Publishing (432 pages, $28) ——— Farming has never been an easy profession. The work is physically demanding and at times dangerous, commodity prices are capricious, agribusiness giants control ...

CHICAGO — A few years ago, Chicago author and activist Rebecca Sive’s book and manifesto, “Vote Her In: Your Guide to Electing Our First Woman President,” set the stage for an action-based plan to elect a woman to the highest office in our land. In it, Sive wrote: “It’s time for a century of women. And then another. And another.” Sive’s latest literary work, “Make Herstory Your Story: Your ...

“WILL” by Will Smith; Penguin Press (411 pages, $30) ——— In show business, it’s common knowledge that success rarely happens in a straight line. But for a 21-year-old Will Smith, it was impossible to know that one night in 1990, his career was about to skyrocket as he sat in Quincy Jones’ Bel Air mansion with a script in hand. The iconic music producer had an idea, this time for a TV show. The ...

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