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Officials say Alaska will receive at least $100 million through a new federal program to expand high-speed internet to underserved areas and promote workforce development. Alaska U.S. Sen. Dan Sullivan coordinated a summit with state, federal and tribal officials in Anchorage, in an effort to ensure parties were on the same page moving forward. Alaska Gov. Mike Dunleavy signed a bill establishing a broadband office to help coordinate between all entities. Sullivan says it is important to seize the opportunity to connect every part of Alaska to broadband.

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A man accused of shooting three Asian American women at a hair salon has been indicted on multiple counts, including committing a hate crime. The Dallas County District Attorney's Office announced the indictment Tuesday of 37-year-old Jeremy Smith for the May 11 shooting at a salon in Dallas' Koreatown. It alleges Smith entered the salon and fired 13 shots from a .22-caliber rifle, wounding three women and endangering four others. It charges Smith with seven counts of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon, each with a hate-crime enhancement. Each count is punishable by from five years to life in prison.

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Powerful explosions have rocked a Russian air base in Crimea, and authorities say at least one person was killed and several others wounded. Russia’s Defense Ministry says that munitions blew up at the Saki base and that the installation was not shelled. It said no warplanes were damaged. But Ukrainian social networks are abuzz with speculation that it was hit by Ukrainian-fired long-range missiles. Ukraine's Defense Ministry has not commented on the cause of the blasts. If the base was, in fact, struck by the Ukrainians, it would mark the first known major attack on a Russian military site on the Crimean Peninsula, annexed by the Kremlin in 2014.

A Black family says racism prompted a suburban Kansas City water park to cancel a private pool party for their son's birthday. Chris Evans, of Lee's Summit, says he signed a contract to have the party with about 250 guests for his 17-year-old son's birthday on Saturday at the Summit Waves park in Lee's Summit. But an official with the park told the family when they arrived that the party was canceled. The city's Parks and Recreation Department, which operates the water park, said Tuesday that officials had apologized to the family over miscommunications. It said the party was canceled solely out of concern for safety because of the potential size of the party.

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A top Lutheran bishop issued a public apology to a majority Latino congregation in California for how they were treated after their pastor was fired by the denomination's first transgender bishop. Presiding bishop Elizabeth A. Eaton delivered the mea culpa during the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America's Churchwide Assembly happening in Ohio. Eaton promised to dedicate more denominational resources to diversity and inclusion efforts with the goal of dismantling systemic racism. Members of the California church said they accepted the apology and forgave the church. They also spoke of the pain and trauma they endured after their pastor's removal. The congregation lost financial support and has been worshipping in a parking lot.

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The U.S. Department of Justice asked a federal judge this week to bar Idaho from enforcing its near-total abortion ban while a lawsuit pitting federal health care law against state anti-abortion legislation is underway. The Idaho law is set to automatically take effect on Aug. 25. It makes it a crime for anyone to perform abortions, punishable by up to five years in prison. Physicians who are charged can defend themselves at trial by arguing that the abortions are necessary to save a patient's life or that they were performed because of rape or incest. Meanwhile, a Wyoming judge is considering whether to put that state's abortion ban on hold while another lawsuit moves forward.

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Italy’s most decorated resistance fighter against fascist and Nazi forces during World War II has died at age 103. The Rome chapter of the National Partisans Association of Italy said Mario Fiorentini died at a Rome hospital on Tuesday. During the war, Fiorentini commanded a group of partisans that fought the regime of dictator Benito Mussolini and then Italy’s German Nazi occupiers. He became legendary among partisans for having escaped from Nazi-run jails four times. Fiorentini turned down an opportunity to run for Italy's Parliament after the war and instead pursued a mathematics degree. He later taught at universities in Italy, Canada and the United States.

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The fast-food chain Chipotle Mexican Grill will pay $20 million to current and former workers at its New York City restaurants for violating city labor laws. The settlement between the city and Chipotle was announced Tuesday. It covers about 13,000 employees who worked at the chain’s New York City outlets between 2017 and this year. The $20 million deal is the largest worker protection settlement in New York City history. Scott Boatwright, Chipotle’s chief restaurant officer, said the restaurant chain is pleased to be able to resolve the issues. He said Chipotle has taken steps to improve compliance.

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The mother of a man fatally shot by a North Carolina police officer during an attempted car theft has filed a federal lawsuit claiming the officer broke the law when he shot her unarmed son several times, called in the incident, then fired again. Attorneys say Brandon Combs died after he was shot while behind the wheel of Concord Officer Timothy Larson’s police SUV in February. The Charlotte Observer reports that attorneys for Virginia Tayara filed the complaint Tuesday in Winston-Salem federal court accusing Larson and the City of Concord of excessive force, assault and battery, wrongful and intentional death and gross negligence. Attorney Harry Daniels says the complaint seeks “some form of justice for the Combs family.”

Washington Commanders coach Ron Rivera has fired defensive line coach Sam Mills III and promoted Jeff Zgonina from his role as defensive line assistant. Rivera hired Mills in January 2020 shortly after taking over in Washington, after Mills served on Rivera’s staff throughout his nine-year tenure as Carolina Panthers coach. Washington had 47 sacks and 78 tackles for loss in Mills’ first season as defensive line coach in 2020, but both numbers decreased substantially last season.

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Marine Gen. Michael Langley took over as the top U.S. commander for Africa Tuesday, heading U.S. military operations on a continent with some of the most active and dangerous insurgent groups and a relatively small Pentagon footprint. Louisiana-born Langley made history on Saturday when he became the first African American in the Marine Corps to be promoted to four-star general. He took over U.S. Africa Command in a ceremony at Kelley Barracks in Stuttgart, Germany. Langley is the second African American to lead the command, which has about 6,000-7,000 troops across the continent.

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The white father and son convicted of murder in Ahmaud Arbery’s fatal shooting after they chased the 25-year-old Black man through a Georgia neighborhood have been sentenced to life in prison for committing a federal hate crime. A U.S. District Court judge sentenced Travis McMichael and his father Greg McMichael on Monday in Brunswick. Both were previously sentenced to life without parole in a state court for Arbery’s murder. The McMichaels armed themselves with guns and used a pickup truck to chase Arbery after he ran past their home on Feb. 23, 2020. Neighbor William “Roddie” Bryan, who recorded cellphone video of the slaying, was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

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Southern Colorado authorities say a woman and a sheriff’s deputy were fatally shot at a home over the weekend and that the suspected gunman was found dead inside the home. Police say Deputy Andrew Peery was shot Sunday after he arrived with two other law enforcement officers at the home near Colorado Springs to investigate a report of a shooting. They say 33-year-old John Paz fired at the officers, hitting Peery, and another sheriff’s deputy returned fire. The woman's body was found in the front yard of the home. Police say Paz died of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

Police have identified a fugitive accused of firing shots inside the Mall of America last week before fleeing the suburban Minneapolis shopping complex with the help of several accomplices. Bloomington police say 21-year-old Shamar Alon Lark, of Minneapolis, fired three rounds in front of a Nike store following a fight involving a half-dozen people. The shooting sent some shoppers running for cover and led officials to lock down the mall. Lark and another man accused in the shooting are being sought on suspicion of second-degree assault. Three people accused of helping the two men escape the mall in a hotel shuttle were charged Monday with aiding an offender. No injuries were reported in the incident.

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An incident involving a white Mississippi Highway Patrol officer and three Black men is under investigation after a viral video showed the officer putting a handcuffed man into a chokehold and wrestling him into a ditch. The video shows the officer wrestling a handcuffed man to the ground on Friday in McComb. At one point, the officer appears to use his knee to pin down the handcuffed man. The officer later pointed a weapon at the man's brothers as they filmed the incident. All three men were arrested. Officials say the incident is being investigated. One expert said the video displayed “Bad Policing 101.”

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With a cease-fire between Israel and Palestinian militants holding after nearly three days of violence, Gaza’s sole power plant resumed operations. That came as Israel began reopening crossings into the territory Monday. Israel also lifted security restrictions on southern Israeli communities after the Egyptian-mediated truce took effect late Sunday. It was the worst round of violence since an 11-day war between Israel and Hamas last year. Since Friday, Israeli aircraft had pummeled targets in Gaza while the Iran-backed Palestinian Islamic Jihad militant group fired hundreds of rockets at Israel. The Palestinian Health Ministry said 46 Palestinians were killed. Islamic Jihad said 12  were militants. Israel said some of the dead were killed by misfired rockets.

A Minnesota school district is clashing with the teachers union and LGBTQ allies over a proposed policy that opponents say would undermine equity and inclusion. The proposal by three Becker school board members prohibits “political indoctrination or the teaching of inherently divisive concepts,” in the district’s schools. Those against such a policy say the district is trying to stifle free speech, suppress LGBTQ students and advocates and prohibit the accurate teaching of history and other subjects. It’s the latest instance of polarizing issues that have surfaced in school districts elsewhere; including classroom pride flags, teaching critical race theory and supporting marginalized students.

Shibata-san is tired of cleaning up after the men in her office. One day, when her boss wants to know why there are still dirty coffee cups in a meeting room, she tells an astonishing lie. She can’t because she’s pregnant, and the smell makes her sick. So begins Emi Yagi’s “Diary of a Void,” a bleak, acerbic, melancholy story of a Tokyo woman who fakes a pregnancy to fight back against gender inequality in the workplace. Associated Press reviewer Ann Levin says this is a debut novel you won’t want to miss. Published by Viking, “Diary of a Void” will be released on Tuesday.

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At least nine people were wounded — none critically — in a shooting outside a Cincinnati bar early Sunday, police said. The shooting took place shortly after 1:30 a.m. outside Mr. Pitiful’s bar in the Ohio city’s Over-the-Rhine district, a popular nightlife area. Police said eight men and one woman were wounded, mostly in the lower extremities. The University of Cincinnati Medical Center said nine people were treated and released. Police said an officer fired one round at a suspect who fled the scene, but it was unclear if that person was hit. Mayor Aftab Pureval called the gunfire “completely and totally unacceptable.”

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The United Nations is urging countries with nuclear weapons to stick to their no-first-use commitment of the atomic arsenals. U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Monday that a nuclear arms race has returned amid growing international tension. Guterres spoke in Tokyo after visiting Hiroshima to commemorate victims of the Aug. 6, 1945, atomic bombing. Asked about Russia's shelling on Europe's largest nuclear power plant in Ukraine, Guterres said any attack on a nuclear plant is “suicidal.” He said nuclear disarmament is moving backward, and arms race investments would be better spent fighting climate change and poverty. He also urged Japan to stop funding coal plants.

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Australian Foreign Minister Penny Wong has called for a cooling of tensions after Beijing accused her of “finger-pointing” in her criticism of China’s military exercises in response to U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan. Wong criticized China’s launch of ballistic missiles during the ongoing air and sea drills around Taiwan, which Beijing claims as part of its territory. She also signed a joint statement with the United States and Japan that condemned firing of missiles into Japanese exclusive economic zones and accused China of “raising tension and destabilizing the region.” The Chinese Embassy in Australia said it's unacceptable to finger point what it called China’s justified actions to safeguard state sovereignty and territorial integrity.

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A cease-fire between Israel and Palestinian militants has taken effect in a bid to end nearly three days of violence that has killed dozens of Palestinians. Egyptian officials had worked to bring the sides to an agreement after the flare-up of fighting that saw Israeli aircraft pound targets in Gaza and militants fire hundreds of rockets that reached deep into Israel. Rocket fire and airstrikes continued until the scheduled start of the truce at 11:30 p.m. (2030 GMT; 4:30 p.m. EDT). More than 40 Palestinians were killed in the violence, including 15 children and four women. Israel began its offensive Friday and has kept up airstrikes since then, while militants have lobbed barrages of rockets into Israel.

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Kevin Harvick got his groove back, fittingly at one of his favorite tracks. Harvick ended a 65-race winless drought that lasted nearly nearly two years with his sixth victory at Michigan International Speedway on Sunday. The No. 4 Ford pulled away from Bubba Wallace and the rest the field following a restart with 35 laps to go. The Stewart-Haas Racing driver took advantage of clean air, helping him coast to his 59th victory. Wallace finished second in his No. 23 Toyota followed by Denny Hamlin in his No. 11 Toyota.

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Over five decades in Washington, Joe Biden knew that the way to influence was to be in the room where it happens. But in the second year of his presidency, some of Biden’s most striking, legacy-defining legislative victories have come about by staying out of it. It's a counterintuitive turn for Biden, who's long promoted his decades of Capitol Hill experience. Biden’s aides chalk up his victories to the fact that he's playing the role of cheerleader rather than legislative quarterback. Democratic Sen. Jon Tester of Montana says that in Biden's heart, he's a U.S. senator. And because of that, Tester says Biden "understands allowing this to work is how you get it done.”

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